Reported by Calls Reported Admin 2015-10-19 10:28:12


Tips and tricks check WHO CALLED from 800-303-8110

  • Report all suspicious calls and scam phone numbers found in Ads, Calls, Texts & Websites
  • Protect yourself from scammers and spammers
  • Don’t pick up on an unidentified number
  • Make a note of the unknown number
  • Run the digits through a Reverse Phone Lookup to search for information about the caller, which may include details like social media profiles, photographs, and job histories created on LinkedIn
  • Use Facebook To Look Up An Unknown Caller

Recent Comments for 8003038110

5 Comments
Post by Pat,

8003038110 You should probably run your anti-virus and anti-malware - looks like your computer may be infected -  However - no reputable company - including Microsoft and its partners - will call you unless you've called them first -  More here:www -microsoft -com security online-privacy avoid-phone-scams -aspxCybercriminals don't just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites - They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from Microsoft - They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license - Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following:Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords - They might also then charge you to remove this software -Take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable -Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services -Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there -Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes -Telephone tech support scams: What you need to knowCybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you - They might even guess what operating system you're using -Once they've gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a website to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it - Once you do this, your computer and your personal information is vulnerable -Do not trust unsolicited calls - Do not provide any personal information -Here are some of the organizations that cybercriminals claim to be from:Windows HelpdeskWindows Service CenterMicrosoft Tech SupportMicrosoft SupportWindows Technical Department Support GroupMicrosoft Research and Development Team (Microsoft R & D Team)Report phone scamsLearn about how to report phone fraud in the United States - Outside of the US, contact your local authorities -How to protect yourself from telephone tech support scamsIf someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support calls you:Do not purchase any software or services -Ask if there is a fee or subscription associated with the "service -" If there is, hang up -Never give control of your computer to a third party unless you can confirm that it is a legitimate representative of a computer support team with whom you are already a customer -Take the caller's information down and immediately report it to your local authorities -Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support -What to do if you already gave information to a tech support personIf you think that you might have downloaded malware from a phone tech support scam website or allowed a cybercriminal to access your computer, take these steps:Change your computer's password, change the password on your main email account, and change the password for any financial accounts, especially your bank and credit card -Scan your computer with the Microsoft Safety Scanner to find out if you have malware installed on your computer -Install Microsoft Security Essentials - (Microsoft Security Essentials is a free program - If someone calls you to install this product and then charge you for it, this is also a scam -)Note: In Windows , Windows Defender replaces Microsoft Security Essentials - Windows Defender runs in the background and notifies you when you need to take specific action - However, you can use it anytime to scan for malware if your computer isn’t working properly or you clicked a suspicious link online or in an email message -Learn more about Windows DefenderWill Microsoft ever call me?There are some cases where Microsoft will work with your Internet service provider and call you to fix a malware-infected computer—such as during the recent cleanup effort begun in our botnet takedown actions - These calls will be made by someone with whom you can verify you already are a customer - You will never receive a legitimate call from Microsoft or our partners to charge you for computer fixes -More informationFor more information about how to recognize a phishing scam, see Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently -If you need help with a virus or other security problem, visit the Microsoft Virus and Security Solution Center -To help protect against viruses and other malicious software, download Microsoft Security Essentials -Windows includes antivirus protection that’s turned on by default -

Post by Sandra Bafia,

800-303-8110 A "Virus Alert" appeared on my computer -  It said to call --- which was the Microsoft Help desk -  I called and the person said I had been hacked by Russians -  Then he wanted to sell me a security software so I hung up and ran my antivirus program -

Post by Geadeaux,

8003038110 A relative was having problems with he PC and was attempting to get in touch with Norton to get some assurance there were no viruses, etc - on her computer - She had Norton installed and functioning -  An internet search for "Norton" returned this number -  A tech named "Martin Dawson" answered and attempted to gain access to her computer to verify virus and related issues -  When he was unable to access he advised her computer was fine, but  she was the victim of "viral hacking" and Norton would not combat this -  Martin offered her a "special deal" - Norton Internet Security lifetime offer for - Unfortunately, the relative called me before buying and asked me to verify before making the buy -I called the number, challenged the rep and asked to speak to a supervisor -  "Jackson" viewed the results of Martin's call in a log, which aligned with my relative's story - all sounding official and compliant -  He stayed with the deficient Norton story with the need to buy Internet Security -  The offer was a generous special Martin had given due the hacking concern for convenience -I contacted the real Norton Support which confirmed Norton was fine as-is and protecting the PC -  The number had no connection with them -

Post by Chris,

800-303-8110 This is the number listed to call when redirected via virus to the scam site "techgeek -com ms " it wants you to call "MICROSOFT WINDOWS LIVE SUPPORT" for help which is probalby just a means to get further information from you - It is not affiliated with Microsoft or any reputable support -

Post by Pat,

8003038110 You should probably run your anti-virus and anti-malware - looks like your computer may be infected -  However - no reputable company - including Microsoft and its partners - will call you unless you've called them first -  More here:www -microsoft -com security online-privacy avoid-phone-scams -aspxCybercriminals don't just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites - They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from Microsoft - They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license - Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following:Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords - They might also then charge you to remove this software -Take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable -Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services -Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there -Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes -Telephone tech support scams: What you need to knowCybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you - They might even guess what operating system you're using -Once they've gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a website to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it - Once you do this, your computer and your personal information is vulnerable -Do not trust unsolicited calls - Do not provide any personal information -Here are some of the organizations that cybercriminals claim to be from:Windows HelpdeskWindows Service CenterMicrosoft Tech SupportMicrosoft SupportWindows Technical Department Support GroupMicrosoft Research and Development Team (Microsoft R & D Team)Report phone scamsLearn about how to report phone fraud in the United States - Outside of the US, contact your local authorities -How to protect yourself from telephone tech support scamsIf someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support calls you:Do not purchase any software or services -Ask if there is a fee or subscription associated with the "service -" If there is, hang up -Never give control of your computer to a third party unless you can confirm that it is a legitimate representative of a computer support team with whom you are already a customer -Take the caller's information down and immediately report it to your local authorities -Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone claiming to be from Microsoft tech support -What to do if you already gave information to a tech support personIf you think that you might have downloaded malware from a phone tech support scam website or allowed a cybercriminal to access your computer, take these steps:Change your computer's password, change the password on your main email account, and change the password for any financial accounts, especially your bank and credit card -Scan your computer with the Microsoft Safety Scanner to find out if you have malware installed on your computer -Install Microsoft Security Essentials - (Microsoft Security Essentials is a free program - If someone calls you to install this product and then charge you for it, this is also a scam -)Note: In Windows , Windows Defender replaces Microsoft Security Essentials - Windows Defender runs in the background and notifies you when you need to take specific action - However, you can use it anytime to scan for malware if your computer isn’t working properly or you clicked a suspicious link online or in an email message -Learn more about Windows DefenderWill Microsoft ever call me?There are some cases where Microsoft will work with your Internet service provider and call you to fix a malware-infected computer—such as during the recent cleanup effort begun in our botnet takedown actions - These calls will be made by someone with whom you can verify you already are a customer - You will never receive a legitimate call from Microsoft or our partners to charge you for computer fixes -More informationFor more information about how to recognize a phishing scam, see Avoid scams that use the Microsoft name fraudulently -If you need help with a virus or other security problem, visit the Microsoft Virus and Security Solution Center -To help protect against viruses and other malicious software, download Microsoft Security Essentials -Windows includes antivirus protection that’s turned on by default -

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